University of Minnesota
http://www.umn.edu/
612-625-5000
Discover Public Health at the University of Minnesota -- one of the top schools of public health in the country, a distinction that reflects our firm commitment to academic and research excellence.
U-SEEE Preparedness Emergency Response Research Center

 

In today’s world of ever-increasing numbers of natural and manmade threats, one area of SPH research examines the effectiveness of public health preparedness training. The goal is to develop a training model that builds system capacity as individuals and groups apply what they have learned to planning for, and responding to, all public health threats.

This is achieved through the U-SEEE PERRC (University of Minnesota: Simulations, Exercises and Effective Education Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center). The School of Public Health is one of nine accredited schools of public health funded by the Centers for Disease Control as a Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center (PERRC).

U-SEEE PERRC has two focus areas:

  • Research to assess the effectiveness of public health preparedness and response simulation games that are role-based and capability-linked to self-efficacy expectations, knowledge, skills and/or response performance.
  • Research to determine whether training modalities and instructional methods (including electronic performance support tools) result in improved individual and system performance under response conditions.

Related Resources

Contact Info

U-SEEE PERRC Center

Louise Stenberg
Associate Director
sten0197@umn.edu
612-624-8470

U-SEEE PERRC Videos

The goal of U-SEEE is to develop a training model that builds system capacity while individuals apply knowledge to public health practice and demonstrate functional competency in planning for and responding to all public health threats. Specific objectives include:

  • Identify best practices (e.g. design, usability, modalities) for training that incorporate experiential exercises, computer-based simulations and virtual environments that are role-based and capability-linked to demonstrate self-efficacy expectations, knowledge, skills and response performance/
  • Establish metrics for measuring effectiveness and efficiency in improving and sustaining high-level performance of the public health preparedness system. A common conceptual model will be used to identify best practices across the center research activities.

About Support of U-SEEE PERRC

University of Minnesota: Simulations, Exercises, and Effective Education(U-SEEE) Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center (PERRC) is supported by grant number 5P01TP0000301-03 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC/OPHPR). The contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. U-SEEE Principal Investigator: Debra K. Olson.

U-SEEE Core

Based in the School of Public Health Centers for Public Health Education and Outreach (CPHEO), the U-SEEE core coordinates and integrates the efforts of the Center overall.

Specifically, the core:

  • Provides oversight and support for the four individual research projects
  • Coordinates the work of the U-SEEE Scientific Review Committee and Advisory Board
  • Facilitates development and testing of a training model to build system capacity
  • Develops strategies to translate and disseminate research findings from across the Center

U-SEEE Principal Investigator Debra K. Olson oversees the core, with assistance from the U-SEEE Coordinator and the U-SEEE Assistant Scientist.

The PERRC awards are for a five-year project period that began on Sept. 30, 2008, and ends on Sept. 29, 2013.

Debra K. Olson, DNP, MPH, RN
Principal Investigator
Professor and Associate Dean for Public Health Practice
olson002@umn.edu, 612-625-0476

Louise Stenberg
Associate Director
sten0197@umn.edu 612-624-8470

Abigail Brinkmeier
Dissemination and Translation Coordinator
brin0014@umn.edu

Coleen Dorman 
Program Associate
ctdorman@umn.edu

Megan Peck
Graduate Assistant

U-SEEE has created an Advisory Board and Scientific Review Committee (SRC) consisting of representatives from local, state and tribal organizations, health care facilities and academia. Both groups also include individuals who are experienced with the development and use of simulations and exercises, the research process, educational design and the public health system.  Six members of the Advisory Board also serve on the SRC.

Roles

Shared by U-SEEE PERRC (Research Center) and PERL (Learning Center), the Advisory Board provides input and guidance to U-SEEE overall, promoting synergy between the two Centers and translation of educational research and promising practices. The SRC advised U-SEEE PERRC on the Pilot Research Program and made final determinations regarding funding of applicants. Due to discontinuation of the Pilot Research Program after September 2011, the SRC will cease meeting separately; it will nonetheless continue to exist, with an amplified role in promoting translation of research to practice.

  • Scientific Review Committee Members
    (also serving on the Advisory Board)

    Jill DeBoer, MPH
    (Scientific Review Committee Chair)
    Director, Academic Health Center Emergency Preparedness Program, and Assoc. Director, Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP)
    University of Minnesota

    Kathie Krichbaum,  PhD, RN, ANEF
    Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Academic Programs, School of Nursing, University of Minnesota

    Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH
    Director, Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy; Director, Minnesota Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance; Professor, Environmental Health Sciences, Adjunct Professor, Medical School, University of Minnesota
    Member, Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Keisha Varma, PhD
    Assistant Professor, Dept of Educational Psychology, College of Education and Human Development
    University of Minnesota

  • Advisory Board Members

    Debra Olson (U-SEEE PERRC & PERL Principal Investigator and Chair)
    Professor and Assoc. Dean for Education
    School of Public Health
    Univ. of Minnesota
    Minneapolis, MN
    olson002@umn.edu

    Craig Hedberg (Co-Investigator/Lead Investigator)
    Assoc. Professor, Environmental Health Sciences
    School of Public Health
    Univ. of Minnesota
    Minneapolis, MN
    hedbe005@umn.edu

    Alan Aarhus
    Training Coordinator, North Dakota Department of Health
    Emergency Preparedness and Response
    aaarhus@nd.gov

    Christopher Atchison
    Clinical Professor & Assoc. Dean for Public Health Practice, Dept. of Health Management and Policy
    Director, Univ. of Iowa Hygienic Lab
    Director, Upper Midwest Center for Public Health Preparedness
    The University of Iowa
    Iowa City, IA
    chris-atchison@uiowa.edu

    Jeff Bender
    Professor Veterinary Public Health
    University of Minnesota
    136F ABLMS
    1354 Eckles Ave
    St. Paul, MN 55108
    bende002@umn.edu

    Cindy Borgen
    Public Health Planning Unit Supervisor
    Office of Emergency Preparedness
    MN Dept. of Health
    St. Paul, MN
    Cindy.Borgen@state.mn.us

    Cathy Clark
    Director, Field Services Branch
    Division of Homeland Security & Emergency Management
    St. Paul, MN
    Cathy.Clark@state.mn.us

    Jill DeBoer
    Department Director
    AHC Office of Emergency Response
    University of Minnesota
    Minneapolis, MN 55455
    jdeboer@umn.edu

    Terry Dwelle
    ND State Health Officer
    ND Dept. of Health
    Bismarck, ND
    tdwelle@nd.gov

    Robert Einweck
    Saint Paul – Ramsey County Department of Public Health
    Maplewood, MN 55109
    robert.einweck@co.ramsey.mn.us

    John Hick
    Assoc. Medical Director, Emergency Medical Services
    Hennepin Co. Medical Center
    Medical Director, Office of Emergency Preparedness, MN Dept. of Health
    Assistant Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Univ. of Minnesota
    Minneapolis, MN
    john.hick@comcast.net

    Louise Stenberg
    Associate Director of U-SEEE PERRC & PERL
    sten0197@umn.edu

    Phyllis Howard
    Office for the Elimination of Health Disparities
    North Dakota Department of Health
    phahoward@nd.gov

    Brian Kaczmarski
    Western Wisconsin Public Health Readiness Consortia
    brian.kaczmarski@co.polk.wi.us

    Kathleen Krichbaum
    Assoc. Professor
    University of Minnesota School of Nursing
    Minneapolis, MN
    krich001@umn.edu

    Aggie Leitheiser
    Director of Emergency Preparedness
    MN Dept. of Health
    St. Paul, MN 55164-0975
    aggie.leitheiser@state.mn.us

    Jane Miller, Lead Investigator
    Director, Teaching/Learning Initiatives
    Interprofessional Education and Resource Center
    IERC Office of Education
    Univ. of Minnesota
    Minneapolis, MN 55455
    mille142@umn.edu

    Colleen Monahan, Lead Investigator
    Director, Center for the Advancement of Distance Education (CADE)
    Adjunct Assistant Professor, Division of Community Health Sciences
    University of Illinois at Chicago
    Chicago, IL 60612-4394
    cmonahan@uic.edu

    Doug Murphy
    Emergency Preparedness Regional Coordinator
    Fargo Cass Public Health
    Fargo, ND 58102
    DMurphy@cityoffargo.com

    Michael Osterholm
    Professor, Environmental Health Sciences
    Adjunct Professor, School of Medicine
    Director, Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy
    Director, MN Center for Excellence of Influenza Research and Surveillance
    Univ. of Minnesota
    Minneapolis, MN 55455
    mto@umn.edu

    Katey Pelican
    Assistant Professor, Veterinary Population Medicine
    University of Minnesota
    pelicank@umn.edu

    Lisa Pentony
    Public Health Preparedness Program Director
    WI Division of Public Health
    Dept. of Health Services
    Madison, WI 53702
    Lisa.Pentony@dhs.wisconsin.gov

    Cheryl Petersen-Kroeber
    Education, Exercise and Planning Supervisor
    Office of Emergency Preparedness
    MN Dept. of Health
    St. Paul, MN 55164
    Cheryl.Petersen-Kroeber@state.mn.us

    Deb Radi
    MDH Office of Emergency Preparedness
    Education, Exercises, Planning Unit Supervisor
    St. Paul, MN 55164-0975
    Deb.Radi@state.mn.us

    Peter Raynor
    Assistant Professor, Environmental Health Sciences
    University of Minnesota
    praynor@umn.edu

    Carol Rollins
    Environmental Services Supervisor
    Ho-Chunk Nation
    carol.rollins@ho-chunk.com

    Janet Shanedling
    Director of Educational Development
    Academic Health Center
    Univ. of Minnesota
    Minneapolis, MN 55455
    janet@umn.edu

    Ed Snetsinger
    White Earth Reservation
    Mahnomen, MN 56557
    Edwards@whiteearth.com

    Carolyn Strubel
    CSI Coordinator
    Cities Readiness Initiative Coordinator
    State of Wisconsin Division of Public Health
    carolyn.strubel@wisconsin.gov

    Dominic Travis
    Associate Professor, Veterinary Population Medicine
    University of Minnesota
    datravis@umn.edu

    Keisha Varma
    Assistant Professor
    Dept. of Educational Psychology
    College of Education and Human Development
    Univ. of Minnesota
    Minneapolis, MN 55455
    Keisha@umn.edu

    Tim Wiedrich
    Bioterrorism Director
    ND Dept. of Health
    Emergency Preparedness & Response
    Bismarck, ND 58501-1959
    twiedric@nd.gov

  • Retrospective Cohort Study of Responders Training & System Performance
    The researchers proposed that extending “lessons learned” response assessments to training histories of individual responders would identify what training modalities contributed to improved response.

    Training Histories

    It is standard practice to identify “lessons learned” from major events (hurricanes, floods, airplane crashes, etc.), but the focus is usually on the impact on the affected community and communications, equipment, and infrastructure needs of responders. This doesn’t address individual training histories, which are a major component of how responders work during events.

    Project Relevance

    Extending the concept of assessing “lessons learned” further into the past, to individual responders’ trainings, provided insight into how future trainings can be improved.

    Tools and Resources

    The researchers produced the following tool from their research: Improve Departmental Processes with the Public Health Performance Evaluation Primer

    Lead Investigator
    Craig Hedberg, PhD, University of Minnesota
    Associate Professor, Division of Environmental Health Sciences
    School of Public Health

    Co-Investigators
    Jill DeBoer, MPH, University of Minnesota
    Department Director, AHC Office of Emergency Response
    Associate Director, Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP)

    Aggie Leitheiser, RN, MPH
    Director of Emergency Preparedness at the Minnesota Department of Health
    Instructor, University of Minnesota School of Public Health

    Jeff Bender, PhD, University of Minnesota
    Associate Professor, Veterinary Medicine
    Associate Professor Veterinary Public Health, School of Public Health

    Co-Director, Center for Animal Health and Food Safety
    Patrick Bohan, PhD, MSEH, MS, PhD, RS, DAAS
    CAPT, USPHS (Ret)
    Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Health Science
    East Central University, OK

  • Effectiveness of Simulated Disaster Response Scenarios
    Disaster 101 is an immersive simulation workshop that is designed especially for health science students in Public Health, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Veterinary Medicine, and Dentistry at the University of Minnesota. Learn more

    The researchers propose that engaging inter-professional health students in realistic simulated disaster response scenarios will improve system performance and quality disaster response through the acquisition of knowledge and team-based skills.

    Project Relevance

    Given that the frequency and severity of disasters is increasing, public health and health care professionals have a responsibility to attain competence in emergency readiness.

    The data gathered during this project was used to improve teaching of disaster education and effective team-building for new and experienced health professionals and build the capacity of the public health preparedness system.

    Studying “Disaster 101″

    How does Disaster 101 improve:

    • Emergency preparedness response (knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) in action)?
    • Teamwork KSAs?

    These were assessed immediately following training, six months after training, and one year after participating in the event.

    Tools and Resources

    The researchers produced the following tool from their research: Disaster 101: An immersive emergency preparedness and crisis leadership workshop

    Lead Investigator

    Jane Miller, MA, PhD
    Director, AHC Simulation Center and Inter-professional Education and Resource Center
    University of Minnesota

    Co-Investigator
    Elizabeth McClure, MD, MPH
    Medical Director, AHC Office of Emergency Response
    University of Minnesota

    Other Key Staff
    Joan Rambeck, MS, RN, CPNP
    Training Coordinator, AHC Office of Emergency Response
    University of Minnesota

  • Creating High Reliability Teams for Public Health Preparedness

    The researchers proposed that interdisciplinary team effectiveness can be learned during in situ simulations, and performance problems and efficiencies could be identified and categorized into specific behavioral markers.

    Didactic Training versus In Situ Simulation

    What are the differences in performance between didactic training and in situ simulation training?

    Do in situ simulations:

    • Reduce missteps and miscommunications in the real world environment?
    • Improve exercise performance?
    • Impact team dynamics and function?

    Project Relevance

    In critical incidents and events, delays, mistakes, and errors result from team failure and communication breakdown. This study examined how an in situ simulation strategy can be used to help state Department of Health department operations centers (DOCs) increase their effectiveness, efficiency, and ability to respond to the effects of disasters.

    Tools and Resources

    The researchers produced the following tool from their research: Moving Beyond HSEEP (Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program), creating well- functioning teams for preparedness response.

    Lead Investigator
    William Riley, PhD,

    Other Key Staff

    Paige Anderson Bowen, MPH
    University of Minnesota Program Manager,
    Division of Health Policy and Managment,
    School of Public Health

    Mickey Scullard, MPH
    Minnesota Department of Health Project Coordinator
    Exercise and Education Planner
    Office of Emergency Preparedness

    Cheryl Petersen-Kroeber, MEP Minnesota Department of Health
    Education, Exercises, and Planning Unit Supervisor
    Office of Emergency Preparedness

    Jane Braun, MPH, EM Minnesota Department of Health
    Deputy Director of Emergency Preparedness
    Office of Emergency Preparedness

    Samantha Morgan, MPH Minnesota Department of Health
    CDC Prevention Specialist
    Office of Emergency Preparedness

    Consultants

    Stan Davis, MD, and Kristi Miller, RN, MS

    Medical Teamwork Consultants

  • Using Collaborative Virtual Environments in Preparedness and Emergency Response Planning
    The researchers proposed that using a CVE improves strategies, methods, and outcomes in emergency response for general and vulnerable populations, as well as daily public health practice.

    Effective, Efficient Response
    Virtual environments like Second Life show great promise in addressing issues like planning and coordination structures for responding to catastrophic events.

    Potential benefits of Collaborative Virtual Environments include:

    • Modernization of planning processes, products, and tools
    • Improvement of training, education, and development of emergency response planners
    • Laying better groundwork for collaborative approaches
    • Creating lower cost simulations

    This observational study, based on an organizational model, used pairs of emergency planning groups from local health departments to compare CVE-facilitated exercises to those performed without using the CVE.

    This observational study, based on an organizational model, will use pairs of emergency planning groups from local health departments to compare CVE-facilitated exercises to those performed without using the CVE.

    Project Relevance
    Responses to catastrophic events like Hurricane Katrina have shown that improvements to operations plans and planning processes are necessary to create more effective and efficient responses. The amount of research into CVEs is lacking, and this study addressed this gap.

    Tools and Resources

    The researchers produced the following tool from their research: Point of Dispensing Planning: Training in a Virtual World

    Lead Investigator
    Colleen Monahan, DC, MPH (Second Life name:  Sweeny Todd)
    Director, Center for the Advancement of Distance Education (CADE)
    Adjunct Professor, School of Public Health
    University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)

    Co-Investigators
    Research Consultant: Brian Mustanski, PhD
    Assistant Professor, Depts of Psychiatry and Psychology
    University of Illinois at Chicago

    Other Key Staff
    Jack Neuner, BA,
    Associate Director of Operations.
    Center for the Advancement of Distance Education (CADE)

  • © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
  • The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Privacy